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Posts Tagged ‘mission statement’

Several weeks ago, I went to a parents meeting for the local school district-homeschool partnership program.  Simon will be enrolled with them for kindergarten next year and next year’s schedule was one of the meeting’s agenda items, so I figured it would be worthwhile for me to attend.

What I didn’t appreciate was that developing mission and vision statements was the main purpose of the meeting.  Getting a roomful of people (maybe a couple dozen) to try to formulate and agree on mission and vision statements in less than an hour is unrealistic to begin with.  Add to that the poor conceptualization of the process and the instructions we were given, and it was doomed before we even started.  We were told that the vision was suppose to describe what we wanted to achieve and the mission was supposed to describe how we would make the vision happen (I’m not sure I agree with that, but let’s leave that aside).  Then the room was split in half, with one half told to work on developing a vision statement and the other half to work on a mission statement.  Hello?  How are we supposed to describe how we’re going to make the vision happen if they’re still figuring out what the vision is on the other side of the room?  We tried anyhow, but in the end, we had about five statements proposed by different people (one of them mine) and no consensus.  Then we got together as a large group again to share our work, and their vision statements sounded suspiciously like our mission statements.  I asked whether we really needed to have separate vision and mission statements and was brushed off.  On the whole, it was a frustrating experience.

However, the experience did have value in that it got me thinking about mission statements and defining the purpose of the things we do.  I had come across a quote online that I have not, for the life of me, been able to locate since, so I don’t know the exact wording and I can’t attribute it to its original author (it may have been St. Katharine Drexel).  It seems like a great mission statement (or is it a vision statement?), so I have adopted it for my homeschool.  It was something like, “The purpose of education is to prepare our children for whatever service God may someday call them to.”  This is rich; there is a lot there to ponder on.

Then I went on to make a list of my goals, what I want my children to be able to do as a result of their education (dare I say, a vision statement?).  In no particular order, here’s what I came up with:

  • to think critically
  • to value truth and reason
  • to communicate effectively
  • to be respectful and empathetic to people in diverse situations
  • to have a well-developed conscience; to be honest and responsible
  • to appreciate beauty as found in nature, art, and music
  • to know, love, and serve God
  • to have the skills to carry out projects independently—to plan a project, locate resources, use resources effectively, keep materials organized, manage time wisely, work diligently, and produce appropriate results
  • to make choices that promote health, both physical and mental
  • to understand the interconnectedness of human lives with each other and the environment; to value social justice and environmental responsibility
  • to apply knowledge to real-world situations; to do “hands-on” problem-solving

Next year will be a challenging one for homeschooling.  Not only will Simon be in kindergarten, but we have just decided that Peter will return to being homeschooled for grade 7.  He will still go to school every day–he will be in band and Science Olympiad at the middle school he currently attends.  We believe that this will give him the best of both worlds.  However, it will be an adjustment for all of us.  I am hopeful that defining my mission and vision before we begin will help me make good decisions as I plan for next year and deal with issues as they arise.

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